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TOSCANA COLLECTION 1

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TOSCANA COLLECTION 1

Measurements & Installation Tips

MEASURE & INSTALL TIPS

Consider the following hints when planning to dress up your windows:

 

  • Consider both the practical and aesthetic needs of the window treatment, when deciding how it will be installed
  • Be aware of anything that may interfere with the installation, i.e., corners, doors and built in furniture
  • Consider the added length of the finial when determining the length of the rod
  • Use a steel measuring tape or carpenter's ruler, for accurate and consistent measurements
  • Be precise, round all measurements to the nearest eighth of an inch
  • Measure all windows, even if they appear to be the same size
  • Use a worksheet or window diagram to help keep measurements clearly organized
  • Select the hardware before final determinations are made on the amount of fabric needed
  • Do not install drapery hardware on the window frame or crown molding

 

The Windows Worksheet has been designed to assist you in personalizing window treatments.

 

Download the Worksheet  (Adobe Acrobat required)



INSTALLATION TIPS

 

Attaching Finials
Finials and End Caps either have pre-inserted screws that twist into the rod or top-mounted set screws that overlap onto the rod. Use the tightening key or a screwdriver to secure set screws.



To Shorten Drapery Rods:

 

Wooden Rods
Use a fine tooth saw and a miter box to obtain a straight cut. After cutting, drill a pilot hole in the center of the end so a Finial can be easily attached.

Metal Rods
Use a hacksaw, steel saw or tube cutter. If the Rod has an inner liner, you may wish to cut the Rods separately. Please protect the Rod when cutting, to avoid scratching the surface of the Rod.



Connecting Drapery Rods:

 

Wooden Rods
All drapery rods will be pre-drilled on both ends. A splicing screw will be needed to combine Rods. This double-ended screw should be inserted into one of the rods with pliers. The other drapery rod can then be screwed onto the first rod. If the drapery rod has been shortened, a pilot hole will need to be re-drilled into the center.

Metal Rods
A Connector must be ordered to combine most metal drapery rods. The Connector is a short tube that is inserted inside the rods at the point of connection.

A Center Support is recommended for all Rod lengths 8' or greater.



Connecting Traverse Rods:

 

Wood Traverse Drapery Rods: Wood traversing rods can be connected with a double ended screw. The gap between the rods can be hidden by a Traverse Rod Connector or a decorative Traverse Bracket. The metal tracks used in conjunction with the wood rods can be combined several ways. The traverse tracks can be installed so that two one-way draws meet in the middle. The overlap arm will hide the seam between panels. Tracks can also be spliced together for a continuous one-way draw. Be sure to support both sides of the spliced track ends by installing brackets on either side of the joined areas. These methods can be done with hand-draw tracks. Corded tracks will need to be professionally re-strung and corded to ensure proper function.

Metal Traverse Drapery Rods: Metal rods can be connected with the use of a splice. Order a splice separately for this type of installation. Insert the splice into the top portion of the track (the area where brackets are inserted) to join the two rods together. Tighten the set screws to secure the joined rods. Attach brackets along either side of the sliced track to support the connection.

Connecting the traversing tracks: The metal tracks can be combined several ways. The traverse tracks can be installed so that two one-way draws (corded or hand draw) meet in the middle. The overlap arm will hide the seam between drapery panels and tracks. Tracks can also be spliced together for a continuous one-way draw. Attach the metal splice to one track and click the other track into place to secure the two tracks together. Install brackets on both sides of the spliced track to ensure stability. For best results, splice the rods together as tightly as possible for a smooth transition for glide movement. Corded tracks will need to be spliced and restrung by a professional.

These general instructions apply to all Robert Allen Window drapery hardware collections, unless otherwise noted in the individual collection Product Information Guide.

Glossary

GLOSSARY

Adapter
A small part which allows a finial to fit drapery rods of different diameters.

Apron
Horizontal decorative wood trim below the window sill.

Bracket
The main support for the drapery rod, which extends from the wall. Brackets are available in standard, extended, double or a hang bracket style. Double brackets, or the attachment of a hang bracket, allows for two rods. Extended brackets provide more clearance space from the wall.

Center Draw
A term used with traversing rods to note that the drapery panels will close at the window’s center point.

Center Support
A bracket used to support longer rods from sagging in the middle. Center supports can also hide rod connection points when splicing rods together.

Clearance
The distance from the mounting surface to the drapery rod.

Connector & Connector Screw
A light weight tube used to connect two metal rods. It also provides strength at the point of connection. A connector screw is a double ended screw that is used to attach the ends of two wood rods together.

Elbow Connector (Corner Angle)
An adjustable corner angle that attaches two rods together. This item can be used in bay windows or around corners to keep a seamless rod flow.

Endcap
A simple finish option for the end of a rod. It is offered as an alternative to a finial for situations in which an obstacle does not allow room for a finial.

Finial
Decorative end pieces designed to attach to the end of rods, originally used to stop the rings from falling off.

Finial Height
Vertical measurement, when installed, from top to bottom.

Finial Length
Horizontal measurement, when installed, from bottom edge to tip.

Frame
The trim surrounding the window.

Glide
A plastic tab that is inserted into a traverse track and used to attach the drapery panel to the traverse rod. Roller glides have ball bearings or small wheels and should be used for heavier treatments.

Inside Mount Bracket
A support for the rod within the jamb of the window. Inside mounts do not allow for finials.

Jamb
The inner side and top sections of a window frame.

Master
The arm of the traverse track that holds the edge of the drapery. They are available in one-way draw (one master carrier) or center draw (one master carrier and one overlap arm to hide the drapery closure).

Mullion
The vertical or horizontal wooden strip which separates panes of glass in a window.

One-way Draw
A term used with traversing rods to note that the drapery panel is designed to open in one direction.

Pin on Hook
A metal pin, which slides into pleated draperies, to attach them to the rings.

Projection
The measurement of an item’s extension from the wall. Bracket projection is measured from the wall surface to the center of the bracket cradle (rod center point).

Return
The flat portion of a drapery heading that wraps around the corner of the rod to cover the end of the rod and the bracket.

Ring
A ring is used to attach the drapery treatment to the rod. They are sized larger than the rod’s diameter for ease of movement.

Ring Diameter
The horizontal measurement, from the inside left edge to the inside right edge.

Rod
The core element from which the drapery treatment is hung. Rods are made of either metal or wood and can be cut shorter or combined for custom sizing. A secondary drapery rod may also be offered for double rod installations.

Rosette
A decorative detail designed for additional accent. It is mounted on a screw and can be attached to a bracket or a tieback post.

Secondary Rod
The rod that sits behind the main, decorative rod for double drapery panel treatments. This rod requires special double rod brackets or bracket attachments for installation.

Sill
The lower horizontal part of the window frame; a shelf-like projection.

Tieback (Holdback)
Decorative accents mounted to the wall which are designed to hold a drapery treatment to each side of the window. Straight-posted tiebacks can also be used to hold scarves, create swag treatments, or hang curtain panels.

Tieback Diameter
Horizontal measurement, when installed, across the front centerline.

Tieback Extension
Measurement from the wall to the front of the tieback.

Tieback Length
Front length measurement before it returns to the wall.

Traverse Rod
A rod that features a metal track with glides to attach draperies to. This can be operated by cord or by hand draw systems. Metal traverse rods have the track constructed inside of the rod structure, while wooden rods contain a cut out section allowing for a metal track to be inserted separately.

Wand
A baton attached to a ring or a master carrier used to assist in adjusting the curtain movement.

FAQs

TRAVERSE ROD FAQ’S

 

Traversing in METAL ROD collections

 

Q: How many metal rod collections offer traversing options?

A: Traversing rods are available in five metal collections: Al Fresco, Architrave, Ferraforte, Metropolitan, and Provence. Reference each collection within the e-catalog for further details regarding finishes, rod, diameters, and functional qualities.

Q: How does a metal traverse rod work?

A: The traverse rod is an extruded aluminum pole constructed with internal hollow channels that allow for glides and brackets to be inserted. The brackets are either mounted from the top or the back of the rod and the glides sit inside the bottom channel of the rod. Each track is lubricated with a silicone spray in order to assist in the ease of glide movement. Drapery panels are hung from the glides either by stitching or by the use of a curtain pin attachment. The master carriers offer additional support for the starting edge of the drapery panel and provide an overlap arm for center draw applications. End stops offer a permanent placement for the draperies to stay fixed in place and prevent glides from getting stuck at the end of the rod where the finials or end caps are mounted.

Q: How much weight does a traverse rod hold?

A: Traverse rods function smoothly between 2-3 lbs per foot of drapery panel weight. This means that lighter draperies are preferred for this rod construction over heavier treatments. Roller glides can be used in place of tab glides in order to help distribute the weight of heavier drapery panels.

Q: How do you connect two traverse rods together?

A: When connecting two traverse rods a traverse rod splice must be ordered. The splice is a metal bar that is inserted into the top track area that holds the two rods together. Insert the splice into the two tracks and tighten with an Allen key to set the screws. Attach a bracket on both sides of the splice to ensure strength and stability. Glides and master carriers can be inserted on the extended track as desired. For best results, be sure to splice the rods together as tightly as possible in order to ensure a smooth transition for the glides.

Q: How can I layer two traverse rods for a double rod installation?

A: The Metropolitan collection offers a 2" and 4" bracket along with a 2" extender piece. A traverse rod with a 2" projection can sit inside of a rod with a 4" or 6" projection, providing you with a front and back track for your draperies.

Traversing in WOOD ROD collections

Q: How many wood rod collections offer traversing options?

A: Traversing rods are available in three wood collections: Parisian, Chess, and Casual Elegance. Reference each collection within our drapery hardware ecatalog for further details regarding finishes, rod diameters, and functional qualities.

Q: How does traversing work in the wood rod collections?

A: A metal traversing track is inserted into a partially cut out wood rod. The wood rod hides the metal track and gives the appearance of a standard wood rod construction. The track is an extruded aluminum piece that is constructed with an internal chamber that allows for glides and cording to be inserted. The brackets are mounted to the top inside section of the rod and hold the track in place with a plastic fastener. Each track is lubricated with a silicone spray in order to assist in the ease of glide movement. Drapery panels are hung from the glides either by stitching or by the use of a curtain pin attachment. The master carriers offer additional support for the starting edge of the drapery panel and provide an overlap arm for center draw applications. End stops offer a permanent placement for the draperies to stay fixed in place and prevent glides from getting stuck at the end of the rod where the finials or end caps are mounted.

Q: How much weight does a traverse rod hold?

A: Traverse rods function smoothly with up to 6 lbs per foot of drapery panel weight. This means that lighter draperies are preferred for this rod construction over heavier treatments. Corded tracks tend to work better when heavier treatments are used.

Q: How do you connect two traverse rods together?

A: When connecting two traverse rods, there are a few options available for assembly. The wood rods can be connected with a double ended screw. The gap between the rods can be hidden by a Traverse Rod Connector or a decorative Traverse Bracket.

Q: Are double traversing tracks available?

A: Yes. All collections are available with double track constructions. A dual track bracket is provided and an additional track is supplied for the back treatment.

Q: What is a C-ring?

A: A C-ring is a separate item that is attached to the glide and serves as a decorative element, imitating the look of a standard rod with rings. This ‘C’ shaped ring goes three quarters of the way around the rod, attaching on one end to the top hole in the specially designed c-ring glide. Both corded and hand draw tracks are available with C-ring constructions

Tips & Disclaimers

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